Earlier today, I came across this article on Monday Morning Quarterback.

I expected it to be an in-depth analysis about Cutler, something that might shift my concrete doubt in him. Instead, it was another example of people’s blindness towards his inability to win. 

“I think more attention must be paid to Jay Cutler.”

When it comes to the Chicago Bears, all of the attention is already on Cutler. All of the pressure is already on Cutler. And all of the team’s money is already on Jay Cutler.

Although the title would suggest this was an article about Jay Cutler, it was not. After going through nine points that have nothing to do with the Bears (even though the title of his article was “Jay Cutler: Absolutely Sensational in the Pocket”), Benoit eventually made it to his conclusion.

Here’s what he had to say about the Bears’ quarterback: 

I think more attention must be paid to Jay Cutler. In Chicago’s last two outings he has orchestrated come-from-behind, game-winning drives despite a suspect offensive line and paucity of proven wide receivers. Cutler’s pocket movement was absolutely sensational against the Chiefs. And we sometimes forget that he has one of the best pure arms in the league.

Wow dude, that was a fucking mind-blowing analysis. Weirdly enough, I did watch both of these come-from-behind wins and had no idea that Jay Cutler (our quarterback and highest-paid player) had anything to do with. Thanks for pointing that out.

Seriously though, what the hell makes you think that Jay Cutler needs more attention?

Unless I’m missing something, “more attention” isn’t the answer to our problems, it is the damn problem. Jay Cutler doesn’t need a bigger microscope than he already has. And if history repeats itself, this Bears season will end with a mediocre campaign and a worthless debate over Jay Cutler’s performance.

He’ll put up just enough numbers to claim that the team’s digression since his entrance is not his fault, leading Bears fans to believe that next year will be a different story. Which, of course, it won’t be.

“In Chicago’s last two outings he has orchestrated come-from-behind, game-winning drives despite a suspect offensive line and paucity of proven wide receivers.”

Statistically speaking, Benoit’s analysis of the team’s offensive line is inaccurate. Here’s why. 

Last season, the Chicago Bears allowed 41 sacks. Through five games this season, they’ve only allowed 11.

This means they’re allowing an average of 2.2 sacks per game, and by projection, indicates they will only allow 35.2 sacks all season.

In case that wasn’t clear enough:

Sacks Allowed By Chicago Bears:
2014-15: 41
2015-16: 35.2 (projected)

Now granted, Cutler might get sacked six times on Sunday and this projection will also be inaccurate. But based on my fourth-grade mathematics, Chicago’s offensive line is not ‘suspect.’

If anything, I would say “improved” is a safer adjective. And wait, Jay Cutler had “sensational pocket movement” against the Chiefs?

Isn’t the offensive line responsible for creating a pocket? Doesn’t the quarterback need a pocket to move around in one?

Hm. I guess my high school offensive line coach was full of shit.

“We sometimes forget that he has one of the best pure arms in the league.”

No, we don’t sometimes forget that Jay Cutler has one of the best pure arms in the league.

You just forgot he’s a loser.